Big Announcement!

Big Announcement!

After half a decade of offering early years programming to infants, children, parents, caregivers, and early childhood staff across Calgary, we decided it was time for us to graduate! In celebration of our Fifth Anniversary we’ll be expanding our learning centre this summer and will open our doors as a full PRESCHOOL in September of 2017!

Provincial Curriculum Framework

The recent roll-out of a new early curriculum framework (the first of it’s kind in the province) has provided such a strong foundation for the care and education of young children that we were inspired to build a new preschool from the ground up.

Our Classroom

Weaving together the best practices and principles available in Early Education (learn more in our Philosophy & Pedagogy Section) we are creating a classroom that will nurture playfulness, inquisitiveness, creativity, persistence, and a deep-seated sense of respect and responsibility for diversity and participation.

We can’t wait to have your children join us in a classroom where we are all co-learners in a world full of information and opportunities for growth!

 

A Princess’ place in Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month, and we celebrated International Women’s Day on March 8th by bringing in the YYC Princesses to talk about bravery, boldness, kindness, and what it means to be a role model. We talked about books we love that celebrate female authors, illustrators, and characters, and how reading and learning can open up whole new worlds for us! You can catch the whole segment below!

Outside of this though, is a wider question that permeates the culture of childhood. Are princes and princesses good role models?

A lot of questions have been raised about the gendering of books and toys, and it is hard to argue that the sanitation of old classic folk and fairy tales by big corporations like Disney has not had consequences for our cultural conversations. They also tend to romanticize reality and provide unrealistic expectations for anglicized beauty standards and body images, relationship expectations and heteronormativity, and family types and working problem-solving. These are not small issues.

There are some amazing resources available that deal with this topic. Alyse is a big fan of Peggy Orenstein’s work, especially “Cinderella ate my Daughter“, and a quick google search for “Are Princesses Good Role Models?” will turn up an astounding number of results debating this idea. But it does remain a debate, because despite the problematic implications and expectations, Princesses really can teach some valuable life lessons.
Is ‘kind’ the worst thing a person can be? Gentle, caring, compassionate? These ‘princessy traits’ do not necessitate synonymy with ‘silence’, ‘demureness’ and ‘acquiescence’. You can be kind and bold, brave and empathetic — in fact in seems rarer and rarer that acts of kindness and compassion are not also big, bold and brave acts. In rejecting what is, admittedly, a hyper-feminine presentation, are we not rejecting, at least in part, the idea of values traditionally associated with femininity? If princesses are ‘bad’, are girls and women ‘bad’? And what of all the princesses that exist outside the cartoon status quo, that smash standards and use their considerable influence to achieve some amazing results?

It is important that we celebrate all women and the achievements of every girl during this month. Plurality of representation and the moderation with which we encounter it is formative in our children’s self-image forming. We need all types of role models, all types of heroes, all types of characters, so that children can see a variety dispositions, values, ideas, and ways of being, and begin to identify with different aspects and start forming their worldviews.

So rock on, rebels and witches, astronauts and ranchers, princesses and pop stars… this world has more than enough room for every woman, and a huge need for all of them.

 

Vlog Follow-Up

YouTube wouldn’t let us redirect right to the Dukelow Lab‘s website, so we’ll do that from here, and if you’d like some information on their work with children who have had perinatal strokes, you can check that out there as well!

If you missed the vlog episode “Rhymes & Reasons #12 — The Developing Brain with Mark Piitz” you can view that here:

Rhymes & Reasons #12 — The Developing Brain with Mark Piitz

If you are interested in having your typically developing child participate in current or future research studies, please check out HICCUP Kids through the U of C and Alberta Health Services. Research is essential to improving the health and lives of children and families everywhere, and you can help with just a little time and energy!

Best Movies for Families [from mostly] 2016

Guest Blog
with Movie Maniac Moe from The Calgary Public Library

It’s always easy to find great movies for the 14+ crowd, being that most flicks are aimed at this demographic. On tap for 2016 were many returning franchises for the older kids (and kids at heart), like ‘Avengers: Civil War’, ‘Star Trek Beyond’, ‘Batman versus Superman’, ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story’, and ‘Ghostbusters’.

It is a little harder, though, to find something that you can watch with the whole family. Something without nudity, violence, gore, profanity, images of alcohol, drugs, smoking, or frightening and intense scenes, yet still has something to offer up that appeals across a variety of ages… especially if you have managed to talk an older child into sitting with their parents and younger sibling and promised them “you’ll like it”.

Parents know how often a child will watch something they like — we’re talking dozens, maybe even hundreds of times. I know I am guilty of it myself… some of my fave films I have seen upwards of 40 times! Just like grown-up movies, not all children’s movies are created equal, and poorly made children’s movies can be mind-numbing for adults. But we like what we like and children do even more so.

So have a look at these ten suggestions. They will stand up to multiple viewings — visually stunning, creative, funny, and highly watchable… for the WHOLE family.

zootopia_xlgZootopia

The entire city of Zootopia is populated by animals living, thriving, and holding down regular day jobs. From tiny shrews to the largest elephant, everybody has a place in this society. For any human who has ever gone to a registry office, you will find the scene with the sloth particularly funny. Rated PG for some very mild rude humour.

 

 

 

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For the legions of Roald Dahl fans, the Big Friendly Giant is brought to screen in a manner befitting this beloved story. For those of you who aren’t familiar with the novel by the well loved author, you are in for a real treat. Rated PG for action/peril, some scary moments and brief rude humor, but this should be good for 6 years old and up. Directed by master movie maker, Steven Spielberg.

 

 

fqNhnLkg-7U.movieposter_maxresFinding Dory

The sequel to the very popular Finding Nemo, this Pixar release features the return of the friendly-but-forgetful Blue Tang, Dory. This time the search is for her long-lost parents. Along the way everybody learns something new about the real meaning of family. Rated PG for some mild thematic elements. The young kids will love this one.

 

 

 

The Jungle Bookjungle_book

Everyone is likely familiar with little Mowgli, the boy-child raised in the jungle by a pack of wolves. This Rudyard Kipling story has been adapted to film many many times in the past seventy plus years. This version features only one live person, and the little boy is wonderful. The CGI (computer generated images) are so seamless, many times you are certain you are looking at real animals. Lots of A-list stars are doing the voices and parents can have extra fun trying to guess who’s who. Rated PG for some sequences of scary action and peril, but it should be suitable for six and up (with parental guidance). You will love the elephants!

Untitled-1If you can track down the live-action adaptation from 1994 (a little hard to find these days), that was the standard for my young girls

As I mentioned above, the story is of such enduringappeal that it is always being remade. So even though one was just released in 2016, a new version has just wound up production and is due for release in 2018. It stars everybody’s favorite Sherlock Holmes, Benedict Cumberbatch, and will no doubt be a hit.

 

 

news-021516b-lgA Beautiful Planet

This film explores the Earth as seen from the International Space Station. Astronauts film what they see as they orbit the planet, and the images are stunning. In the night scenes you can actually see major cities around the world, plus different storms taking place on Earth. From Disney, this is only 45 minutes long, and can be viewed by 5 and up.

 

 

 

Kung Fu Panda 3Kung-Fu-Panda-3-Movie-Poster

In the third installment, Po continues his ‘legendary adventures of awesomeness’, and must fight super villain Kai. To fight him he must try to train his well-intentioned but clumsy fellow pandas. Rated PG for martial arts action and some mild rude humour.

 

 

 

Kukubo_and_the_two_strings_ver13_xxlgbo and the Two Strings

Kubo, a young boy in a fantastical alternative Japan, is kind, clever, and an amazing storyteller. As with other flicks from this movie house, this gorgeously animated offering from Laika Studios tends to be a little darker than the light-hearted, brightly-coloured movies from other creators, but with some parental guidance, this one is genuinely wonderful for 8+, or younger at personal discretion.

 

 

moana_ver5 Moana

Not content with infecting a large portion of the adult population with his catchy earworms in hit musical ‘Hamilton’, Lin-Manuel Miranda turns his skills to the younger generation in the delightful ‘Moana’. There’s at least three songs in this one that neither you nor your little ones will get out of your heads. You’re welcome.

 

 

 

song-of-the-sea-posterSong of the Sea

If the songs of the sea form Moana weren’t enough for your heart, and you missed this hit from a couple of years ago (2014), you’ll definitely want to check it out now. There are a lot of titles on this list from heavy-hitters Disney and Dreamworks, so we always like featuring some of the other studios. We can’t wait for the next from Ireland’s Cartoon Saloon!

 

 

School Success Rx

 

Guest Blog by Calgary’s Child — original link here

With Preschool and Kindergarten Registration starting now, Calgary’s Child share their prescription for school success:

Read, read, read to your child

“Being read to is the single most consistent and reliable predictor of academic success later in life,” says Kurumada Chuang. She recommends reading to your preschooler for 20 minutes every night at bedtime. While you’re at it, stop every so often and ask your child a question about the story before turning the page, such as: “Gosh, why do you think she was sad?” Or, “What do you think is going to happen next?” Making reading more interactive makes it more fun and helps build your child’s comprehension skills.

Help your child learn to follow directions

To help your preschooler get the hang of following directions, practice at home by giving simple commands, such as: “Please help me pick up your toys and put them in the
toy box.” Then, encourage your child to follow through by offering an incentive to do whatever it is you’re asking. Tell your child they can play outside, for example, once they’ve finished putting away their toys. An incentive helps your child understand that following directions makes other fun activities possible. If they don’t follow your directions and, for example, don’t put their toys away, calmly explain that they won’t be able to play with those toys for the rest of the day or go, for example, to the park. Keep it positive by focusing on how clean the playroom will look when you’re done. Then praise your child when they’re successful. “You followed my directions so well. Thank you for helping me put your toys in the toy box like I asked you to! That was so helpful.”

Help your child master sharing and turn-taking

From age 3 to 5, children tend to hoard coveted toys and objects. They’re not really ready to grasp the concept of sharing yet. But you can help your youngster practice by having them ‘take turns’ with toys and catching your child when they share on their own. To help them develop the empathy that true sharing requires, state what they did and how it makes others feel, such as: “Thank you for sharing. It makes your sister feel good when you share the ball.” Your child should be able to ‘own’ special or new toys, though, so keep them out of sight on playdates or in their room, away from siblings. By Kindergarten, children are capable of sharing well and taking turns. If your child isn’t there yet, help them get the hang of it by inviting a friend over for a cooperative task such as baking cookies. If things aren’t going well, calmly ask your child to sit out. Pretty soon, they’ll get the idea and want to join in on the fun again. You can also read your child books about sharing and discuss them. In the classic tale, Stone Soup, retold by Heather Forest, two hungry travelers make soup from ingredients everyone in the town contributes. What makes the soup extra delicious is the sharing it took to make it.

Help your child make friends

If you get the sense your toddler or preschooler needs a little help in the social department, try hosting playdates with others your child likes or with whom they have common interests. Playdates offer an opportunity to break away from the group and foster individual friendships. You might begin by asking your preschooler: “How about a playdate with Grace? I notice that she likes to draw too.” If you’re not sure whom to invite over first, ask your child’s preschool teacher if there’s anyone in the classroom who might be a good match for your child. Then feel free to go from there and make the rounds so your child gets the chance to know several children better. To help your child play host(ess), let them pick the snack and ask them beforehand what games and activities s/he and their friend might like to do. On the playdate, feel free to play along and stay close by to make sure everyone stays safe. But give your child and their friend the chance to play on their own too. To help things go smoothly, keep playdates to two hours; children start to get tired after that. And keep it simple by inviting just one child over at a time.

Practice sharing

From age 3 to 5, kids aren’t yet capable of grasping the concept of sharing, but you can help your preschooler get the hang of it by having them ‘take turns’ with toys and catching them when they share on their own. “Stating what she did and how it makes others feel, such as: ‘Thank you for sharing. It makes your sister feel good when you share your toast,’ helps her develop the empathy that true sharing requires,” says Marcy Guddemi, Ph.D., Executive Director of the Gesell Institute of Human Development. You can also read your child books about sharing and discuss them together. Hone your child’s listening skills. At the dinner table and during car rides, help your preschooler hone their listening skills by asking them to wait to speak until their brother (or vice versa) has finished his sentence. When it’s her turn, remind her, “Now it’s your turn to talk. Thank you for being patient and for being such a good listener while your brother was talking.” Explain that being a good listener shows respect for the speaker, whether it’s her brother or her teacher and the other students at school who are trying to hear what the teacher has to say. Mention that it’s a two-way street: When she’s a good listener, she’s showing the same kind of respect that she gets when others listen to her. If she continues to interrupt, keep reminding her that she’ll get the chance to talk. Becoming a good listener, like many things, can take lots of practice.